+

Perceptions of the coach-athlete relationship predict the attainment of mastery achievement goals six months later: A two-wave longitudinal study among F.A. Premier League academy soccer players

Nicholls, Adam R. and Earle, Keith and Earle, Fiona and Madigan, Daniel J. (2017) Perceptions of the coach-athlete relationship predict the attainment of mastery achievement goals six months later: A two-wave longitudinal study among F.A. Premier League academy soccer players. Frontiers in Psychology, 8 (684).

[img]
Preview
Text
Nicholls Earle Earle Madigan (in press).pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (267kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
Madiganfpsyg684.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (176kB) | Preview

Abstract

All football teams that compete within the F. A. Premier League possess an academy, whose objective is to produce more and better home-grown players that are capable of playing professionally. These young players spend a large amount of time with their coach, but little is known about player’s perception of the coach-athlete relationship within F.A. Premier League Academies. The objectives of this study were to examine whether perceptions of the coach-athlete relationship changed over six months and if the coach-athlete relationship predicted self-reported goal achievement among F. A. Premier League academy players. This study included cross-sectional (n = 104) and longitudinal (n = 52) assessments, in which academy soccer players completed a measure of the coach-athlete relationship and goal achievement across either one or two time periods. The cross-sectional data were subjected to bivariate correlations, whereas the longitudinal data were analyzed using multiple regressions. Perceptions of the coach-athlete relationship remained stable over time. The coach-athlete relationship predicted the achievement of mastery goals six months later. Enhancing the quality of the coach-athlete relationship among elite adolescent athletes appears to be a suitable way of maximizing mastery achievement goals, particularly among developmental athletes who participate in team sports.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This document is protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All right reserved. It is reproduced with permission.
Status: Published
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00684
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF636 Applied psychology
School/Department: School of Sport
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/2176

University Staff: Request a correction | RaY Editors: Update this record