+

Changing patterns of occupational mortality in the countries of the United Kingdom, 1991-2011: A comparative analysis of linked census mortality records

Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vitta and Leyland, Alastair H and McKee, Martin and Ralston, Kevin and Stuckler, David (2017) Changing patterns of occupational mortality in the countries of the United Kingdom, 1991-2011: A comparative analysis of linked census mortality records. The Lancet Public Health, 2 (e501).

[img]
Preview
Text
THELANCETPUBLICHEALTH-D-17-00318 (2).pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview
[img] Text (Research Article)
THELANCETPUBLICHEALTH-D-17-00318.docx - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (705kB)

Abstract

Background

Recent, detailed assessments of occupational mortality rates are lacking. We provide up-to-date assessments of mortality by occupation across the United Kingdom.

Methods

We analysed representative samples of working age adults (aged 20-59 years), using linked census and death records. Self-reported main occupation was coded into 60+ groups in the 2001 census, with follow-up for death until the end of 2011. Comparable occupation data were available for Scotland in 1991 and used to assess trends over time. All-cause mortality rates (per 100,000 person- years) were calculated, stratified by sex and age-standardised.

Findings

Over three-fold differences in occupational mortality rates were seen during 4.51 million person- years of follow-up. Among men in England, health professionals had the lowest mortality (224.7,95%CI 145.3-304.1), with managers and teachers also having low rates. The highest mortality occurred in elementary construction jobs (701.3, 95%CI 593.1-809.4), housekeeping jobs and factory workers. Among women, teachers and business professionals experienced low mortality, with factory workers and those in the garment trade having high rates. Mortality rates have generally fallen, but stagnated or even increased amongst women in some occupations, such as cleaners. Simulation models suggest if occupational mortality rates in England/Wales applied to Scotland, there would be 631 fewer men and 273 fewer women of working age dying in Scotland every year.

Interpretation

Occupational mortality rates show large differences throughout the UK. The known excess mortality in Scotland is concentrated amongst disadvantaged groups, some experiencing increases in absolute mortality.

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
DOI: 10.1016/S2468-2667(17)30193-7
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HA Statistics
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
School/Department: School of Psychological & Social Sciences
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/2653

University Staff: Request a correction | RaY Editors: Update this record