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Multidimensional perfectionism and antisocial behaviour in team sport: The mediating role of angry reactions to poor performance

Grugan, Michael Connor (2018) Multidimensional perfectionism and antisocial behaviour in team sport: The mediating role of angry reactions to poor performance. Masters thesis, York St John University.

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Abstract

Researchers have recently asserted that perfectionism has an important role to play in generating antisocial athlete behaviour. In examining the relationship between multidimensional perfectionism and antisocial athlete behaviour within the context of team sport, the current thesis advanced this particular theme. These relationships were explored using a non-experimental, cross-sectional research design. Competitive adult and junior athletes (n = 257, Mage = 20.71 years, SD = 4.10) completed measures of multidimensional perfectionism, angry reactions to poor performance, and antisocial athlete behaviour. In total, three structural equation models were constructed and tested.The first model was designed to examine the independent effects of perfectionism dimensions in relation to antisocial behaviour focussed on outperforming others and achieving personal success in sport (i.e., dark striving antisocial behaviour). This model revealed that socially prescribed perfectionism emerged as the only positive predictor of dark striving antisocial behaviour. The second and third models were designed to test the mediating role of angry reactions to poor performance (i.e., poor personal and poor teammate performance) in the relationships between key components of perfectionism and antisocial acts during competition. The second model revealed that angry reactions to poor personal performance failed to mediate any of the relationships.By contrast, the third model revealed two significant indirect effects: self-oriented perfectionism shared a negative relationship (via angry reactions to poor teammate performance) with antisocial acts during competition, whereas other-oriented perfectionism shared a positive relationship (via angry reactions to poor teammate performance) with antisocial acts during competition. In line with research focussing on the independent effects of perfectionism in relation to hostile and disagreeable forms of interpersonal behaviour, the present findings indicate that socially prescribed and other-oriented perfectionism are the most problematic perfectionism dimensions in relation to antisocial athlete behaviour.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Status: Published
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports
School/Department: School of Sport
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/2900

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