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Applying discursive psychology to 'fact' construction in political discourse

Burke, Shani and Demasi, Mirko ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1112-8141 (2019) Applying discursive psychology to 'fact' construction in political discourse. Social and Personality Psychology Compass.

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Burke & Demasi (forthcoming) - Applying discursive psychology to 'fact' construction in political discourse (RaY versio.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 15 April 2020.

Abstract

In this paper, we show how discursive psychology can be used to show how ‘facts’ are used rhetorically by politicians. That is, they are more than neutral reflections of an objective reality—these ‘facts’ are highly attuned to the local context of political argumentation. We draw upon examples from two studies that used discursive psychology to analyse two different political contexts: (1) Islamophobia in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo attack and (2) debates over Great Britain and the European Union. In both contexts, the analysis uncovers how politicians challenge both the context and the relevance of a fact. The context of ‘facts’ is reconstructed to undermine their original argumentative strength, whereas questioning the relevance of a ‘fact’ undermines it both as fact and as a rhetorical tool to be used in a debate. These findings show how discursive psychology can contribute to knowledge about political communication, as well as the benefits of applying discursive psychology to political discourse.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Burke, Shani and Demasi, Mirko (2019) Applying discursive psychology to 'fact' construction in political discourse. Social and Personality Psychology Compass. which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/spc3.12449 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving."
Status: Published
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/spc3.12449
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
School/Department: School of Psychological & Social Sciences
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/3764

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