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Peer Victimisation in University Sport in the UK

Morgan, Elliott (2019) Peer Victimisation in University Sport in the UK. Masters thesis, York St John University.

[img] Text (MSc by Research thesis)
MORGAN ELLIOTT FINAL THESIS - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 21 May 2021.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Abstract

This thesis investigates the nature and prevalence of peer victimisation in UK university sports. The Transactional model of stress (TMS) is used to examine the relationships between peer victimising behaviours, group cohesion and sport amotivation in the presence of a primary and secondary appraisal. A sample of 207 first-year student athletes from 16 universities in the UK completed an online questionnaire regarding peer victimising behaviours. The questionnaire includes measures of challenge appraisals, perceptions of social support, group cohesion (task and social) and sport amotivation. Two moderated mediation models were conducted to examine if challenge appraisal mediated, and perceived social support moderated, the relationship between peer victimisation and the outcomes variables. The results indicated significant negative relationships peer victimisation and group cohesion. Perceived social support moderated the relationship between peer victimisation and group cohesion. The moderation effect reversed the negative relationship resulting in an increase in group cohesion. Perceived social support moderated the relationship between peer victimisation and sport amotivation. The moderation effect reversed the positive relationship resulting in a decrease in sport amotivation. Challenge appraisals did not significantly mediate the relationship between victimisation and either sport amotivation or group cohesion. This study provides further evidence of the high rate of peer victimising behaviours in university sport in the UK. This study provides support for further research into the use of perceived social support in counteracting the negative impacts of these behaviours.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Status: Published
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV557 Sports
School/Department: School of Science, Technology and Health
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/4571

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