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Interactions between perceived behavioral control and personal-normative motives: qualitative and quantitative evidence from a study of commuting-mode choice

Wall, R., Devine-Wright, P. and Mill, Greig (2008) Interactions between perceived behavioral control and personal-normative motives: qualitative and quantitative evidence from a study of commuting-mode choice. Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 2 (1). pp. 63-86.

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Abstract

This article reports a two-phase study of travel-mode choice. It demonstrates a purposive sampling technique using regression residuals, which is useful for linking quantitative and qualitative phases in sequential research designs. It also illustrates the value of mixed methods in terms of increased confidence in findings. Applying Norm-Activation Theory and the Theory of Planned Behavior, the study shows that perceived behavioral control can moderate personal-normative motives' effect on travel-mode decisions. Phase 1 used logistic regression (n = 392) and showed that personal-normative motives' influence on car-use intentions increased with perceived control. Phase 2 participants (n = 24) were interviewed about their travel and accounts echoed quantitative findings with regard to perceived control as a limiting factor on personal-normative motives' influence.

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1558689807309967
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
School/Department: York Business School
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/459

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