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Perfectionistic concerns cognitions predict burnout in college athletes: A three-month longitudinal study

Crowell, Doug and Madigan, Daniel J. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9937-1818 (2021) Perfectionistic concerns cognitions predict burnout in college athletes: A three-month longitudinal study. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology.

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Crowell & Madigan (in press).pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 7 January 2022.

Abstract

The majority of research examining the relationship between perfectionism and athlete burnout has focused on trait perfectionism, while overlooking the importance of the cognitive elements of perfectionism. Perfectionistic cognitions represent an influential cognitive bias driving perfectionistic behavior. Although perfectionistic cognitions have been shown to correlate with burnout symptoms in athletes, this body of work is very limited and does not include college athletes. In addition, it is currently unclear whether perfectionistic cognitions also predict changes in athlete burnout over time. To address these issues, we conducted a two-wave, three month longitudinal study and measured perfectionistic cognitions and burnout in a sample of 170 college athletes both at the start and end of a competitive season. In doing so, we also sought to empirically test the different models of perfectionistic cognitions that have been proposed (original, short, and multidimensional). Using cross-lagged panel models, we found that perfectionistic concerns cognitions predicted increases in burnout. The findings provide initial evidence that perfectionistic cognitions predict changes in athlete burnout over time in college athletes. Consequently, the findings have important implications for our understanding of both athlete burnout and perfectionistic cognitions.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: "This is an accepted version of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology on 7/01/2021 available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1612197X.2020.1869802"
Status: Published
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1612197X.2020.1869802
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
School/Department: School of Science, Technology and Health
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/4834

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