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Perfectionism as a vulnerability following appearance-focussed social comparison: A multi-wave study with female adolescents.

Etherson, Marianne E. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0339-2324, Curran, Thomas, Smith, Martin M. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4754-3032, Sherry, Simon B. and Hill, Andrew P. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6370-8901 (2021) Perfectionism as a vulnerability following appearance-focussed social comparison: A multi-wave study with female adolescents. Personality and Individual Differences, 186, B (111355).

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MS PAID SOCIAL COMPARISON FINAL VERSION.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 27 October 2023.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

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MS PAID SOCIAL COMPARISON FINAL VERSION.docx - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 23 October 2023.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Abstract

This study tests whether perfectionism is a vulnerability factor for distress among female adolescents in the context of appearance-focused social comparison and use of social media. We hypothesized that perfectionism predicts greater depressive symptoms and lower body appreciation following appearance-focused upward social comparisons. One-hundred and thirty-five female adolescents (Mage = 14.70 years, SD = 0.46) completed measures of rigid and self-critical perfectionism once, and depressive symptoms, body appreciation, and appearance-focused upward social comparison once a week for four weeks. Self-critical perfectionism positively predicted depressive symptoms and negatively predicted body appreciation. Self-critical perfectionism also interacted with appearance-focused upward social comparisons to predict greater depressive symptoms and lower body appreciation. No effects emerged for rigid perfectionism. Findings suggest self-critical perfectionism may be an important vulnerability factor for female adolescents following appearance-focused social comparison when using social media.

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2021.111355
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF698-698.9 Personality
School/Department: School of Science, Technology and Health
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/5604

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