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Soft Skills and Psychological Well-being: A Study on Italian Rural and Urban NEETs

Ellena, Adriano Mauro, Marta, Elena, Simões, Francisco, Fernandes-Jesus, Maria ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8868-1968 and Petrescu, Claudia (2021) Soft Skills and Psychological Well-being: A Study on Italian Rural and Urban NEETs. Calitatea Vieții, 32 (4).

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Abstract

Soft skills retain a certain importance in fully understanding the NEET phenomenon: however, only few researchers have focused on them specifically. The aim of this work is two-fold: a) to detect the differences in terms of soft skills and psychological well-being between urban and rural NEETs; and b) to evaluate which of the soft skills analysed may be predictors of psychological well-being. A sample of young 6998 18−34 years old representative of the Italian population was used. Although gender and educational attainment play a key role in determining NEET status, the degree of urbanisation must be considered because it appears to influence the well-being and perceived soft skills of a group of NEETs. The present study shows that females with low educational attainment residing in rural areas have lower levels of well-being than females with low educational attainment residing in urban areas. A similar influence exists in relation to one particular soft skill: positive vision. Furthermore, soft skills predict psychological well-being wherein degree of urbanisation and gender seems to play a determining role. Policies should, therefore, consider these issues in their design and implementation phase

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
DOI: https://doi.org/10.46841/RCV.2021.04.02
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF636 Applied psychology
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
School/Department: School of Education, Language and Psychology
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/5761

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