Quick Search:

“But That Will Not Be the End of the Calamity”: Why Emphasize Viking Disruption?

Cross, Katherine ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9038-5527 (2017) “But That Will Not Be the End of the Calamity”: Why Emphasize Viking Disruption? In: Bintley, M., Locker, M., Symons, V. and Wellesley, M., (eds.) Stasis in the Medieval West? Palgrave MacMillan, pp. 155-178

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Cross reconsiders well-known narratives of the Viking and pre-Viking Age, noting the extent to which scholarship has discussed the former as a period of disruption, and the latter as one of continuity. This interpretation of viking disruption, Cross argues, can be attributed to the concerns of the authors who recorded it—ecclesiastical writers who had vested interests in reestablishing monastic foundations, or who were willing victims of established generic conventions. Focusing on representations of viking disruption in England and Normandy, Cross argues that the political elites who patronized these works were more likely to emphasize the extent to which change had taken place as a result of viking activity when they enjoyed the benefits of social, cultural, and institutional continuity.

Item Type: Book Section
Status: Published
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-56199-2_9
School/Department: Library and Learning Services
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/5959

University Staff: Request a correction | RaY Editors: Update this record