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Peer-victimisation, perfectionism, and mental health in UK university students: An analysis of the Social Reaction and Social Disconnection Models

Collier, Ebony (2021) Peer-victimisation, perfectionism, and mental health in UK university students: An analysis of the Social Reaction and Social Disconnection Models. Masters thesis, York St John University.

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Abstract

Few research papers have analysed peer-victimisation in UK universities, which indicate a prevalence rate of between 10% and 25% (Lund & Ross, 2017). Additionally, few papers have explored the relationship between peer-victimisation and perfectionism, and how these may relate to mental health outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of peer-victimisation and whether peer-victimisation is a predictor of mental health issues. Additionally, the present study aims to assess the extent of importance of the social disconnection (Hewitt, Flett, Sherry & Caelian, 2006) and social reaction (Flett, Hewitt, Oliver & Macdonald, 2002) models. A cross-sectional design was utilised to analyse levels of peer-victimisation, other-oriented perfectionism, self-oriented perfectionism, social prescribed perfectionism, and symptoms of anxiety and depression in undergraduate students in the UK (N = 158). Findings showed a significant relationship between peer-victimisation and mental health issues. Furthermore, partial support was provided for the social disconnection model, as peer-victimisation was found to mediate the relationship between SPP and anxiety. Support was found for the original social reaction model, as peer-victimisation predicted SPP and OOP. However, no support was found for the extended version of the social reaction model, as perfectionism did not mediate the relationship between peer-victimisation and mental health. The findings of this study highlight a relationship between peer-victimisation and mental health in university students. The findings also illustrate a need for further research within this area, in addition to the implementation of anti-bullying policies in UK universities, and interventions to support poor mental health.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Status: Published
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
School/Department: School of Education, Language and Psychology
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/5960

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