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Conversations in geography: journeying through four decades of history and philosophy of Geography in the United Kingdom.

Jöns, Heike, Brigstocke, Julian, Bruinsma, Mette, Couper, Pauline ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0083-223X, Ferretti, Federico, Ginn, Franklin, Hayes, Emily and van Meeteren, MIchiel (2024) Conversations in geography: journeying through four decades of history and philosophy of Geography in the United Kingdom. Journal of Historical Geography. (In Press)

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Abstract

This article offers a critical appraisal of institutionalised knowledge production and exchange on the history and philosophy of geography in the United Kingdom. We examine broad epistemic trends over 41 years (1981–2021) through an analysis of annual conference sessions and special events convened by the History and Philosophy of Geography Research Group (HPGRG) of the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG). We show how organisational, sociocultural, and epistemic changes were coproduced, as expressed by three significant findings. Organisationally, the group emerged through shared philosophical interests of two early career geographers at Queen’s University Belfast in 1980–1981 and received new impetus through its strategic plan 1995–1997, which inspired long-term research collaborations. Socioculturally, the group’s activities contributed to national traditions of geographical thought and praxis in masculinist academic environments, with instances of internationalisation, increasing feminisation, and organisational cooperation. Epistemically, the group’s events in the 1980s shaped contextualist, constructivist, and critical approaches, and coproduced new cultural geography, but the emphasis shifted from historically sensitive biographical, institutional, and geopolitical studies of geographical knowledges, via critical, postcolonial, and feminist geographies of knowledge-making practices in the 1990s, to more-than-human and more-than-representational geographies in the twenty-first century.

Item Type: Article
Status: In Press
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > G Geography (General)
School/Department: School of Humanities
URI: https://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/10233

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