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The predictive ability of the frequency of perfectionistic cognitions, self-oriented perfectionism, and socially prescribed perfectionism in relation to symptoms of burnout in youth rugby players.

Hill, Andrew P. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6370-8901 and Appleton, Paul R. (2011) The predictive ability of the frequency of perfectionistic cognitions, self-oriented perfectionism, and socially prescribed perfectionism in relation to symptoms of burnout in youth rugby players. Journal of Sports Sciences, 29 (7). 695 - 703.

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Abstract

Perfectionism has been identified as an antecedent of athlete burnout. However, to date, researchers examining the relationship between perfectionism and athlete burnout have measured perfectionism at a trait level. The work of Flett and colleagues (Flett, Hewitt, Blankstein, & Gray, 1998) suggests that perfectionism can also be assessed in terms of individual differences in the frequency with which they experience perfectionistic cognitions. The aims of this study were to: (1)examine the relationship between the frequency of perfectionistic cognitions and symptoms of athlete burnout; and (2)determine whether the frequency of perfectionistic cognitions account for additional unique variance in symptoms of athlete burnout above the variance accounted for by self-oriented and socially prescribed dimensions of perfectionism. Two-hundred and two male rugby players (mean age 18.8 years, s = 2.9, range 16-24) were recruited from youth teams of professional and semi-professional rugby union

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Sports Sciences on 3/03/2011, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2010.551216#abstract
Status: Published
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2010.551216
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
School/Department: School of Sport
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/1118

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