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Does perceived social support moderate the relationship between peer-victimisation and adjustment?

Noret, Nathalie and Hunter, Simon and Rasmussen, Susan (2017) Does perceived social support moderate the relationship between peer-victimisation and adjustment? In: BPS Developmental Psychology Section Annual Conference, 13th to 15th September, 2017, Stratford Upon Avon.

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Abstract

Objectives: Although the relationship between peer-victimisation and adjustment is well established, not all victims develop negative outcomes. The transactional model of stress provides a useful framework for examining such individual differences. Specifically, previous research supports the notion that secondary appraisals of available social support may buffer the relationship between peer-victimisation and symptoms of depression and anxiety. However, research exploring the buffering role of perceived social support in the relationship between different types of victimisation and adjustment is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine whether perceived social support moderates the relationships between peer-victimisation and adjustment, and between cyber-victimisation and adjustment.

Methods: Data were collected using an online survey. The survey included a measure of peer-victimisation, the short 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire, and questions relating to perceptions of social support. In total, 2,196 year 8 pupils (aged 12 and 13) participated in the survey, from nine English secondary schools within one local authority region.

Results: Perceived social support moderated the relationship between peer-victimisation and adjustment, and between cyber-victimisation and adjustment. However the direction of this relationship differed.

Conclusions: The findings will be examined in the context of the transactional model of stress and current research on the relationship between peer victimisation, perceived social support, and adjustment. Implications for future research and intervention programmes will be discussed.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Status: Published
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Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
School/Department: School of Psychological & Social Sciences
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/2486

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