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What do students’ chatroom discussions tell us about their attitudes to the use of Google Translate for coursework assignments?

Organ, Alison ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6028-5341 (2018) What do students’ chatroom discussions tell us about their attitudes to the use of Google Translate for coursework assignments? In: Google Translate & Modern Languages Education, 29 June 2018, Centre for Translation and Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Nottingham. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

This paper will present the interim findings of a research project on students’ use of Google Translate (GT) for L2 production. Data was collected from online student forums to gauge the extent to which students spontaneously discuss the use of GT for assignments, and what their posts reveal about their attitudes. Although the main focus of the project will be students’ use of GT at degree level, it is valuable to determine how widespread its use is among GCSE and A level students before they reach university.
The interim findings reveal that use of GT for assignments has been accepted practice among students over the last decade, reflecting behaviour shown in Clifford et al (2013) and Farzi (2016); however, their mixed attitudes to this usage also echo Bower’s (2010) findings. Some respondents discourage the original poster (OP) from using GT because of the likelihood of detection, and there is considerable discussion as to whether teachers can ‘spot’ it or not. Others take a more moralising tone, accusing the OP of laziness, although many offer advice such as post-editing or using better tools. Some, however, claim that they have used it extensively without being detected, echoing Somers et al (2006) and Groves & Mundt (2015) in concluding that GT can produce language equivalent to that of a student of average ability.
These interim findings would appear to confirm that use of GT is prevalent among school-age students, and should help to inform the debate regarding universities’ response to this behaviour.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Status: Unpublished
Related URLs:
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PB Modern European Languages
T Technology > T Technology (General)
School/Department: School of Languages & Linguistics
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/3796

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