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Getting Past Insha’allah: An Interactional Analysis of Face in Business Negotiations Involving G.C.C. Nationals and U.K. Nationals

Bright, Karen (2020) Getting Past Insha’allah: An Interactional Analysis of Face in Business Negotiations Involving G.C.C. Nationals and U.K. Nationals. Doctoral thesis, York St John University.

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Karen Bright final thesis.pdf - Published Version
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Abstract

The aim of this doctoral research study was to gain understanding of the nuances of actual and potential face incidents during business negotiations involving Gulf Co-operation Council (G.C.C.)1 nationals and United Kingdom (U.K.) nationals. Examination of the relevant literature, identified that many written sources for enhancing intercultural negotiation skills are in the ‘how to’ genre and rely on offering an n-step2 approach that promises success if the stated steps are followed. The results of this research study, however, conclude that face is a highly important aspect of negotiations involving G.C.C. nationals and U.K. nationals and the ability to manage face incidents demands more than an n‐step approach.

During this research study, I analysed a range of face incidents that occurred during negotiations involving G.C.C. nationals and U.K. nationals. It is argued that there is a general lack of understanding by U.K. nationals of the concept of face and its wider ranging impact on and for G.C.C. nationals. From the data, a range of potential nuanced face incidents was identified during G.C.C.-U.K. face‐to‐face negotiations that produced differing behaviours between G.C.C. nationals and U.K. nationals. Two main contributions to knowledge arise from the thesis are two conceptual models; the Intercultural Negotiation Earth Model (I.N.E.M.) and the G.C.C. Negotiation Model (G.N.M.).

To conclude, during negotiations involving G.C.C. nationals, U.K. nationals should be aware of the layered and nuanced impact of face for G.C.C. nationals and understand how to manage face incidents and to acknowledge that the stages of negotiations with G.C.C. nationals move to a different rhythm. It is argued, therefore, that future intercultural training in this area should be revised to address such nuanced behaviours.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Status: Published
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
School/Department: York Business School
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/4820

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