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Importance of personal and professional experience for hospital staff in personcentred dementia care: a cross-sectional interview study using freelisting in a UK hospital ward

Petty, Stephanie ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1453-3313, Dening, Tom, Griffiths, Amanda and Coleston, Donna Maria (2019) Importance of personal and professional experience for hospital staff in personcentred dementia care: a cross-sectional interview study using freelisting in a UK hospital ward. BMJ Open.

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Abstract

Objective To detail how hospital staff with differing personal and professional caregiving experiences approach the care of patients with dementia, in order to make practical recommendations for practice.

Design Cross-sectional qualitative interviews.

Setting A UK hospital ward providing dementia care.

Participants A complete hospital ward staff team, constituting 47 hospital staff from 10 professions.

Methods Hospital staff were asked to list their approaches to emotion-focused care in individual, ethnographic freelisting interviews. Cultural consensus analysis was used to detail variations in approaches to dementia care between staff subgroups.

Main outcome measures The most salient listed descriptions of care emphasised by staff members with personal experience of dementia caregiving when compared with staff members without such experience, and descriptions from staff newer to the profession compared with staff with more years of professional dementia caregiving experience.

Results Subgroups of hospital staff showed different patterns of responses both in how they noticed the emotional distress of patients with dementia, and in prioritised responses that they deemed to work. Hospital staff with professional experience of dementia caregiving and staff with fewer years of professional experience prioritised mutual communication and getting to know each patient.

Conclusions Subgroups of hospital staff with personal caregiving experiences and fewer years of professional care experience were more likely to describe person-centred care as their routine ways of working with patients with dementia. It is recommended that personal experience and the novice curiosity of hospital staff be considered as valuable resources that exist within multidisciplinary staff teams that could enhance staff training to improve the hospital care for patients with dementia.

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-025655
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
School/Department: School of Education, Language and Psychology
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/5525

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