Quick Search:

Influence of personality and emotional competences on academic performance: direct and indirect pathways mediated by perceived stress

Min, You, Laborde, Sylvain, Agnes, S and Vaughan, Robert S. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1573-7000 (2021) Influence of personality and emotional competences on academic performance: direct and indirect pathways mediated by perceived stress. Current Issues in Personality Psychology.

[img]
Preview
Text
Influence of personality and emotional competences on academic performance - direct and indirect pathways mediated by perceived stress Manuscript.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

| Preview
[img] Text
Influence of personality and emotional competences on academic performance - direct and indirect pathways mediated by perceived stress Manuscript.docx - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.

Abstract

Among the factors influencing academic performance (AP), individual differences at the trait level such as personality and emotional competences (EC) have been found to play a critical role, similarly to state variables such as perceived stress (PS). The aim of this study was to clarify whether the influence of personality (big five) and EC on AP (general point average) is direct and/or mediated via PS. 537 undergraduate students from a French university (112 male and 425 female, Mage = 19.84 years, SDage = 1.74 years, range = 18 - 30 years; first year: n = 293 – 55%; second year: n = 162 – 30%, third year: n = 82 – 15%) filled out the test battery around three weeks before final examination. Path analysis showed that AP was directly predicted by conscientiousness (+), neuroticism (+), extraversion (-) and perceived stress (-), while perceived stress was predicted by neuroticism (+) and by intrapersonal EC (-). Results illustrate the robust influence of conscientiousness on AP, while EC was not found to influence directly AP, but indirectly via its effect on PS.

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5114/cipp.2021.111423
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF698-698.9 Personality
School/Department: School of Education, Language and Psychology
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/5655

University Staff: Request a correction | RaY Editors: Update this record