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Does biologically categorised training alter the perceived exertion and neuromuscular movement profile of academy soccer players compared to traditional age-group categorisation?

Salter, Jamie ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7375-1476, Black, James, Mallett, James, Barrett, Steve, Towlson, Christopher, Hughes, Jon and De Ste Croix, Mark (2022) Does biologically categorised training alter the perceived exertion and neuromuscular movement profile of academy soccer players compared to traditional age-group categorisation? European Journal of Sport Science.

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Abstract

The individual response to load is multifactorial and complicated by transient and temporal changes in biological maturation. The period surrounding peak height velocity exposes potentially ‘fragile’ individuals to systematic, age-related increases in training loads. Bio-banding allows practitioners to manage the biological diversity and align training to the development needs to each athlete. This study explores the acute impact of maturation on neuromuscular performance and perceived intensity through comparing both chronological and bio-banded training sessions.

55 male soccer players (mean ±SD; age 13.8 ±1.4 years) were recruited from an EPPP academy. Following a warm-up and standardised sub-maximal run (30-15IFT), players competed in five bouts of 5-minute 6v6 small-sided games (SSGs) before repeating the standardised sub-maximal run. The sessions were repeated on three occasions with chronological SSGs and the same with bio-banded SSGs wearing foot-mounted inertial measurement units (PlayerMakerTM) with differential ratings of perceived exertion used to quantify internal loads.

Mixed linear modelling indicated maturity-specific pre-post differences in neuromuscular response, stride length and cadence having contrasting responses pre- (reduced) and post-PHV (increased), and larger changes in post sessions stiffness for pre- (~18.6 kNm-1) and circa-PHV (~12.1 kNm-1) players. Secondly, there were small to large differences in neuromuscular response (RSI stride length, stiffness, and contact time) and perceptions of intensity between chronological and bio-banded sessions, with bio-banding generally reducing pre-post changes.

Bio-banding may offer a mechanism to prescribe maturity-specific training loads which may help to alleviate the impact of repeated exposure to high-intensity activity, thus reducing injury risk whilst promoting long-term player development.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: "This is an accepted version of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in European Journal of Sport Science, on 23/08/2022 available online: "https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17461391.2022.2117090"
Status: Published
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2022.2117090
Subjects: Q Science > QM Human anatomy
Q Science > QP Physiology
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics
School/Department: School of Science, Technology and Health
URI: https://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/6565

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