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The Role of Primary Appraisals in the Relationship between Peer Victimisation and Psychological Wellbeing in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review

Noret, Nathalie, Hunter, Simon and Rasmussen, Susan (2015) The Role of Primary Appraisals in the Relationship between Peer Victimisation and Psychological Wellbeing in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review. In: British Psychological Society Developmental Section and Social Section Annual Conference, 9-11 September 2015, Manchester.

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Abstract

Background: The Transactional Model of Stress proposes that primary appraisals (an individual’s evaluation of a situation, for example the degree to which an experience is threatening) are an important component in understanding individuals’ reactions to stressful situations. The relationship between peer-victimisation and psychological wellbeing is now well established, however the mechanisms through which peer victimisation relates to wellbeing have received comparably little research attention. Therefore the aim of this systematic review is to examine studies that have explored the relationship between peer victimisation, primary appraisal and psychological wellbeing in children and adolescents.

Methods: Literature databases were searched for studies exploring the relationship between peer victimisation, aspects of primary appraisal and psychological wellbeing in children and adolescents.

Findings: Twelve studies were included in the review and suggest that primary appraisal can play a role in understanding the relationship between peer victimisation and psychological wellbeing

Discussion: The findings of this systematic review highlight the lack of research in this area. Findings of the review suggest the role of primary appraisals in children and adolescents’ reactions to peer victimisation.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Status: Published
Related URLs:
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
School/Department: School of Psychological & Social Sciences
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/1011

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