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Attention, working-memory control, working-memory capacity, and sport performance: The moderating role of athletic expertise

Vaughan, Robert S. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1573-7000 and Laborde, Sylvain (2020) Attention, working-memory control, working-memory capacity, and sport performance: The moderating role of athletic expertise. European Journal of Sport Science.

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Attention, Working Memory, & Performance Accepted Manuscript.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 4 March 2021.

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Attention, Working Memory, & Performance Accepted Manuscript.docx - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 4 March 2021.

Abstract

The aim of this research was to detangle the association between attention, working-memory (focusing on both control and capacity functions), and sport performance across athletic expertise. Specifically, the mediating effect of working-memory-control and working-memory-capacity on the attention and performance relationship will be investigated, and whether this effect differs across athlete expertise. A sample of 359 athletes (Mage = 18.91 ± SD = 1.01; 54.87% male) with a range of athletic expertise (novice n = 99, amateur n = 92, elite n = 87, and super-elite n = 81) completed a battery of neurocognitive tasks assessing attention, working-memory-control, working-memory-capacity, and a cognitively engaging motor task (e.g., basketball free-throw task). Athletes with more expertise performed better on tasks of attention, working-memory-control and working-memory-capacity. Results of structural equation modelling indicated a positive association between the cognitive measures and sport performance. Specifically, working-memory-control and working-memory-capacity mediated the attention and sport performance relationship. Additionally, invariance testing indicated larger effects for those with more athletic expertise. These findings provide a better understanding of how attention and the control and capacity functions of working-memory interact to predict performance. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: "This is an accepted version of an article published by Taylor & Francis in European Journal of Sport Science, on 04/03/2020 available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17461391.2020.1739143"
Status: Published
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2020.1739143
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF180-198.7 Experimental psychology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF697-697.5 Differential psychology. Individuality. Self
School/Department: School of Education, Language and Psychology
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/4496

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