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Oxford Ethnography in Education Conference, Oxford University (September 2019) – paper presentation and seminar: Reassembling teachers’ professional knowledge: a socio-material view of the role of intertextual hierarchies during a change to primary mathematics teaching

Unsworth, Ruth ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4900-3590 (2019) Oxford Ethnography in Education Conference, Oxford University (September 2019) – paper presentation and seminar: Reassembling teachers’ professional knowledge: a socio-material view of the role of intertextual hierarchies during a change to primary mathematics teaching. In: Oxford Ethnography in Education Conference, Oxford University (September 2019), September 2019, University of Oxford.

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Unsworth, R. 'Reassembling teachers’ professional knowledge a socio-material view of the role of intertextual hierarchies during a change to pr.pdf - Accepted Version

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Abstract

The formation of teachers’ professional knowledge has been discussed in relation to a wide variety of often interlinking and at times opposing influences. Ethnographic research adds to this discourse studies of knowledge as relationally formed within the cultures, societies and physical worlds of different collectives. Set within 3 months of ethnographic study of knowledge formation within one English primary school, this paper explores the role of intertextual hierarchies during a period of change to teachers’ professional knowledge for the teaching of primary mathematics. Intertextual hierarchies are defined here as an interrelated network of texts and people: texts used and created collaboratively by teachers, leaders and policy makers during the knowledge change process. Drawing on actor-network theory and literacy studies, the act of changing a knowledge base through using and creating a series of texts is explored. I highlight how intertextual hierarchies can carry knowledge from policy into practice, whilst also describing the localisation of knowledge which occurs in the socio-material use and creation of each text. Data reported on draws primarily on fieldwork notes and document analysis, enhanced by semi-structured interviews with 3 of the 12 research participants.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Status: Published
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
L Education > LB1705-2286 Education and training of teachers
School/Department: School of Education, Language and Psychology
URI: http://ray.yorksj.ac.uk/id/eprint/5647

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